Oh, the Places You’ll Go! (A Cisco ACI Story)

In the fashion of my two previous Dr. Seuss style stories I thought I’d take a crack at Cisco Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI.)  Check out the previous two if you haven’t read them and have time to waste:

 

Horton Hears Hadoop: http://www.definethecloud.net/horton-hears-hadoop/

The App on the Crap (An SDN Story) http://www.definethecloud.net/the-app-on-the-crap-an-sdn-story/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congratulations!

This is the time.

The network is changing!

The future is here!

 

With software controllers.

And virtualized widgets.

You can steer traffic

any direction you choose.

Packets are moving. They’ll flow where they flow.

And YOU are the gal who’ll decide where they’ll go.

 

You’ll look up and down paths.  Look ‘em over with care.

About some you’ll say, “No VOIP will go there.”

With an overlay net, and central control,

No packet will flow, down a not-so-good path.

 

And when packets travel

on suboptimal paths.

You’ll reroute those flows,

based on 5-tuple match.

 

Net’s opened wide

With central control.

 

Now net change can happen

and rapidly too

with net as central

and virtual too.

 

And when things start to happen,

don’t panic.  Don’t stew.

Just go troubleshoot.

All layers old, and the new.

 

OH!

THE PLACES YOU’LL GO!

 

You’ll be on your way up!

Packet’s moving in flight!

You’ll be the rock star

who set network right.

 

The network won’t lag, because of central control.

You’ll provision the pipes, avoid traffic black holes.

The packets will fly, you’ll be best of the best.

Wherever they fly, be faster than the rest.

 

Except when they don’t.

Because sometimes they won’t.

 

I’m sorry to say so

but, sadly it’s true

that Bang-ups

and Hang-ups

will happen to you.

 

You can get all hung up

in congestion / jitter.

And packets won’t travel.

Some will just flitter.

 

Applications will fail

with unpleasant time-outs.

And the chances are, then,

that you’ll start hearing shouts.

 

And when applications fail,

you’re not in for much fun.

Getting them back up

is not easily done.

 

You’ll need the app team, spreadsheets , security rules.

You’ll have to troubleshoot through disparate tools.

Find a way to translate from app language to net.

Map L3/L4 to app names, not done yet.

There are services too, that’s a safe bet.

 

Which route did it take, and which networks the problem?

Overlay, underlay, this network has goblins.

Congestion, and drops, latency jitter

Check with the software, than break out the splitter.

You’ll sort this out, you’re no kind of quitter!

 

It can get so confused

two networks to trace.

The process is slow, not what you want for a pace.

You must sort it out, this is business, a race.

What happened here, what’s going on in this place?

 

NO!

That’s not for you!

Those duct tape based fixes.

You’ll choose better methods.

Not hodge-podge tech mixes.

 

Look first at the problem,

what’s causing the issues?

What is it that net, is trying to do?

The app is the answer, in front of you.

 

The data center’s there to run applications!

To serve them to users, move data ‘cross nations.

To drive revenue, open up business models.

To push out new services, all at full throttle.

The application’s what matters.

Place it on a platter.

 

You’ll put the app into focus,

With some abstraction hocus-pocus.

 

You’ll use the language of apps.

To describe connectivity.

Building application maps,

to increase productivity.

 

Use a system focused on policy,

not new-fangled virtual novelty.

Look at apps end-to-end,

Not with the app is VM trend.

 

Whether virtual or physical, you’ll treat things the same.

From L2 to L3, or L4-7,

use of uniform policy, will be your new game.

Well on your way to networking heaven.

 

Start with a logical model, a connectivity graph.

One that the system, deploys on your behalf.

A single controller for policy enforcement.

Sure to receive security’s cheering endorsement.

Forget about VLANs, routes and frame formats,

no longer will networking be the app-deploy doormat.

 

You see to build networks for today and tomorrow,

don’t use band-aids stacked high as Kilimanjaro.

You’ll want to start with REMOVING complexity.

Anything else, just adds to perplexity.

 

Start at the top, in an app centric fashion.

on a system that knows to treat apps as its passion.

 

And will you succeed?

Yes! you will, indeed!

(98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed.)*

KID, YOU’LL MOVE MOUNTAINS!

 

So…

be your app virtual, physical or cloud

with services, simple, complex or astray,

you’re off to Great Places!

Today is your day!

ACI is waiting.

So…get on your way!

 

 

*This is intended as whimsical nonsense.  Any guarantees are null and void based on the complete insanity of the author.

**Disclaimer: I work for Cisco Systems with the group responsible for Nexus 9000 and ACI.  Please feel free to consider this post random vendor rhetoric.**

For more information on Cisco ACI visit www.cisco.com/go/aci

GD Star Rating
loading...

True Software Defined Networking (SDN)

The world is, and has been, buzzing about software defined networking. It’s going to revolutionize the entire industry, commoditize hardware, and disrupt all the major players. It’s going to do all that… some day. To date it hasn’t done much but be a great conversation, and more importantly identify the need for change in networking.

In its first generation SDN is a lot of sizzle with no flash. The IT world is trying to truly define it, much like we were with ‘Cloud’ years ago. What’s beginning to emerge is that SDN is more of a methodology then an implementation, and like cloud there are several implementations: OpenFlow, Network Virtualization and Programmable Network Infrastructure.

 

image

OpenFlow

Open Flow focuses on a separation of control plane and data plane. This provides a centralized method to route traffic based on a 5-tuple match of packet header information. One area OpenFlow falls short is in its dependence on the independent advancement of the protocol itself and the hardware support below. Hardware in the world of switching and routing is Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) based, and those ASICs typically take three years to refresh. This means that the OpenFlow protocol itself must advance, and then once stabilized silicon vendors can begin building new ASICs to be available three years later.

Network Virtualization

Network virtualization is a faithful reproduction of networking functionality into the hypervisor. This method is intended to provide advanced automation and speed application deployment. The problem here arises in the new tools required to manage and monitor the network, the additional management layer, and the replication of the same underlying complexity.

Programmable Network Infrastructure

Programmable network infrastructure takes the configuration of devices from human to machine CLI/GUI interfaces to APIs and programming agents. This allows for faster, more powerful and less error prone device configuration from automation, orchestration and cloud operating system tools. These advance the configuration of multiple disparate systems but are still designed based on network operating system constructs intended for human use, and the same underlying network complexities such as artificial ties between addressing and policy.

All of these generation 1 SDN solutions simply move the management of the underlying complexity around. They are software designed to operate in the same model, trying to configure existing hardware. They’re simply adding another protocol, or protocols, to the pile of existing complexity.

image

Truly software defined networks

To truly define the network via software you have to look at the entire solution, not just a single piece. Simply adding a software or hardware layer doesn’t fix the problem, you must look at them in tandem starting with the requirements for today’s networks: automation, application agility, visibility (virtual/physical) security, scale and L4-7 services (virtual/physical.)

If you start with those requirements and think in terms of a blank slate you now have the ability to build things correctly for today and tomorrow’s applications while ensuring backwards compatibility. The place to start is in the software itself, or the logical model. Begin with questions:

1. What’s the purpose of the network?

2. What’s most relevant to the business?

3. What dictates the requirements?

The answer to all three is the application, so that’s the natural starting point. Next you ask who owns, deploys and handles day two operations for an application? The answer is the development team. So you start with a view of applications in a format they would understand.

image

That format is simple provider/consumer relationships between tiers or components of an application. Each tier may provide and consume services from the next to create the application which is a group of tiers or components, not a single physical server or VM.

You take that idea a step further and understand that the provider/consumer relationships are truly just policy. Policy can describe many things, but here it would be focused on permit/deny, redirect, SLAs, QoS, logging and L4-7 service chaining for security and user experience.

image

Now you’ve designed a policy model that focuses on the application connectivity and any requirements for those connections, including L4-7 services. With this concept you can instantiate that policy in a reusable format so that policy definition can be repeated for like connections, such as users connecting to a web tier. Additionally the application connectivity definition as a whole could be instantiated as a template or profile for reuse.

You’ve now defined a logical model, based on policy, for how applications should be deployed. With this model in place you can work your way down. Next you’ll need network equipment that can support your new model. Before thinking about the hardware, remember there is an operating system (OS) that will have to interface with your policy model.

Traditional network operating systems are not designed for this type of object oriented policy model. Even highly programmable or Linux based operating systems have not been designed for object programmability that would fully support this model.  You’ll need an OS that’s capable of representing tiers or components of an application as objects, with configurable attributes. Additionally it must be bale to represent physical resources like ports as objects abstracted from the applications that will run on them.  An OS that can be provisioned in terms of policy constructs rather than configuration lines such as switch ports, QoS and ACLs. You’ll need to rewrite the OS.

As you’re writing your OS you’ll need to rethink the switching and routing hardware that will deliver all of those packets and frames. Of course you’ll need: density, bandwidth, low-latency, etc. More importantly you’ll need hardware that can define, interpret and enforce policy based on your new logical model. You’ll need to build hardware tailored to the way you define applications, connectivity and policy.  Hardware that can enforce policy based on logical groupings free of VLAN and subnet based policy instantiation.

If you build these out together, starting with the logical model then defining the OS and hardware to support it, you’ll have built a solution that surpasses the software shims of generation 1 SDN. You’ll have built a solution that focuses on removing the complexity first, then automating, then applying rapid deployment through tools usable by development and operations, better yet DevOps.

If you do that you’ll have truly defined networking based on software. You’ll have defined it from the top all the way down to the ASICs. If you do all that and get it right, you’ll have built Cisco’s Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI.)

For more information on the next generation of data center networking check out www.cisco.com/go/aci.

 

Disclaimer: ACI is where I’ve been focused for the last year or so, and where my paycheck comes from.  You can feel free to assume I’m biased and this article has no value due to that.  I won’t hate you for it.

GD Star Rating
loading...